CASSINA : object

(w/ Sottsass Associati, 1990)

Problem: Cassina, the long-standing manufacturer of high-design Italian furniture, wanted to bring bold new pieces to market that could be produced at reasonable cost, yet still showcase the craft and quality the brand was known for.

 

Solution: Each of the pieces (two lounge chairs, a sofa and a daybed) were conceived to stand on their own or together in a collection. The "Selim" lounge chairs were purposely undersized, employing car seat production technology that provided a lot of formal freedom at low cost. Finished in durable canvas or wool fabrics, Selim were intended to be used as accessories for any interior. 

 

The "Danube" sofa was an architectural take on two and three person seating. Intended for more formal settings, the flat external panels could be easily dressed up or down to provide a variety of looks in both wood and fabric. The sculpted interior provided comfortable, ergonomically supportive cushioning for extended sitting.

 

The "Diwan" daybed was designed to be a couch by day and a bed by night. A straightforward wood frame with punched metal panels defined a free soft space to dress with pillows, cushions or used as is for resting.      

Impact: While not achieving "classic" status, "Selim" stayed in the Cassina catalog for years, delivering a steady stream of revenue, while Danube made inroads to the office furniture market for Cassina, appearing in many waiting rooms across Italy. Diwan brought renewed focus to an ignored typology.   

© 2016 Richard Eisermann